Posts Tagged ‘Hank Aaron’

West Palm Beach Spring Training History – Connie Mack Field and Municipal Stadium

March 2nd, 2018

West Palm Beach boasts a proud Spring Training history. Both the Houston Astros and the Washington Nationals now call West Palm Beach their Spring Training home. Opened in 2017, The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches is located at 5444 Haverhill Road in West Palm Beach.

The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches, West Palm Beach, Florida (Photo Courtesy of Pete Kerzel)

Since 1998, the Miami Marlins and the St. Louis Cardinals have play their Spring Training home games at Roger Dean Stadium in nearby Jupiter Florida. Located at 4751 Main Street, Roger Dean Stadium is just 12 miles north of The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches.

Roger Dean Stadium, Jupiter Florida,

Spring Training in West Palm Beach dates back to at least 1928. The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches and Roger Dean Stadium both were preceded by two other now-lost ballparks, Connie Mack Field and West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium.

Connie Mack Field (Photo – The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee)

West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Complex (Postcard Holley Studio, Palm Beach Florida)

Connie Mack Field (formerly Municipal Athletic Field (1924 to 1926) and Wright Field 1927 to 1952)) was located approximately seven miles southeast of The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches at the intersection of Tamarind Avenue and Okeechobee Boulevard.

Intersection of Okeechobee Blvd. and Tamarind Avenue, Former Site of Connie Mack Field.

Connie Mack Field was the spring training home of the St. Louis Browns from 1928 to 1936, and the Philadelphia/Kansas City Athletics from 1946 to 1962. Previously, the Athletics had trained in Florida at Durkee Field (later renamed J. P. Small Memorial Park) in Jacksonville, Florida, from 1914 to 1918, and Terry Park in Fort Myers, Florida, from 1925 to 1936.

Bobby Shantz at Connie Mack Field circa 1950’s during Philadelphia Athletics Spring Training

Connie Mack Field also was home to the West Palm Beach Indians, who played in the Florida East Coast League from 1940 to 1942, the Florida International League from 1946 to 1955, and the Florida State League in 1955. In 1956 the Florida State League West Palm Beach Sun Chiefs played at Connie Mack Field, and from 1965 to 1968 the Florida State League West Palm Beach Braves played their home games at the ballpark.

Connie Mack Field Grandstand (Photo – The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee)

Demolished in 1992, the former grandstand site is now a parking garage for the Kravitz Center for the Performing Arts.

Entrance to Kravis Center Parking Garage, Iris Street, Former Site of Connie Mack Field

The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee has memorialized the ballpark with a display located near the elevators on the first floor of the Kravis Center Parking Garage.

Display About Connie Mack Field Located on Level 1 of the Kravis Center Garage – The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee

The display includes photographs of the ballpark, two of which are reproduced above (with attribution to The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee).

Photos of Connie Mack Field – The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee)

Home plate is marked with a plaque just to the south the Kravitz Center Parking Garage.

Home Plate Looking Toward Pitchers Mound, Former Site of Connie Mack Field, Located Adjacent To Kravis Center Parking Lot, West Palm Beach, Florida

A significant portion of the former infield is now a storm water retention pond.

Former Site of Connie Mack Field, Infield Near the Intersection of Okeechobee Blvd. and Tamarind Avenue,

The former left field line paralleled Okeechobee Boulevard.

Okeechobee Blvd. Looking East , Former Site of Connie Mack Field Left Field Line

Center field was located at the northeast corner of Okeechobee Boulevard and Tamarind Avenue.

Former Site of Connie Mack Field, Center Field Near the Intersection of Okeechobee Blvd. and Tamarind Avenue

The plaque honoring the location of home plate states “Connie Mack Field (Wright Field)  This monument marks the exact location of home plate. The concrete base that supports this plaque is the original base set in 1924. Some of the great players who batted here Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jackie Robinson, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, & Ted Williams. Go ahead step up to the plate.”

Home Plate Marker, Former Site of Connie Mack Field, Located Adjacent To Kravis Center Parking Lot, West Palm Beach, Florida

West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium was located just five miles southeast of The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches, at 715 Hank Aaron Drive.

Doyle Alelxander, Circa Early 1970s, West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium

Municipal Stadium was the spring training home of the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves from 1963 to 1997, and the Montreal Expos from 1969 to 1972 and 1981 to 1997. Previously, the Braves had trained in Florida at Waterfront Park in St. Petersburg, Florida, from 1922 to 1937, and McKechnie Field (now LECOM Park), in Bradenton, Florida, from 1938 to 1940, and 1948 to 1962.

Batting Tunnels, Municipal Stadium, West Palm Beach, Florida (Postcard Montreal Expos)

The stadium complex included four playing fields in addition to the stadium structure.

Aerial View of Municipal Stadium, West Palm Beach, Florida (Postcard Montreal Expos)

In addition to Spring Training, West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium was the home of the Florida State League West Palm Beach Expos from 1969 to 1997 and the Senior Professional Baseball Association West Palm Beach Tropics from 1989 to 1990.

West Palm Beach Expos 1987 Program

Demolished in 2002, the former ballpark site is now a Home Depot and Cameron Estates, a gated housing development.

Home Depot Parking Lot Entrance, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Parking Lot Behind Grandstand

The entrance to the former stadium complex is on Hank Aaron Drive, where it intersects North Congress Avenue.

Intersection of Hank Aaron Drive and Congress Drive, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium

The grandstand was located near the entrance to the Home Depot off Hank Aaron Drive.

Entrance to Home Depot Off Hank Aaron Drive, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Grandstand and Infield

Back Entrance To Home Depot From Hank Aaron Drive, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium First Base Grandstand

Home plate was located approximately in the back lot behind the Home Depot.

Home Depot Back Lot Looking West, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Home Plate

 

Al Bumbry, Circa Early 1970s, West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium

The right field line paralleled Hank Aaron Drive.

Hank Aaron Drive Looking South Along former right field line of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium

A portion of Cameron Estates, behind the Home Depot, now occupies the former right field.

Cameron Estates, Private Drive Off Hank Aaron Drive, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Right Field

Center field was located in the northeast section of Cameron Estates, behind the Home Depot back lot.

Cameron Estates on Left and Home Depot Back Lot on Right, Looking East, Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Center Field

Cameron Estates also envelops portions of the former practice fields that sat to the south of the stadium structure.

Entrance to Cameron Estates, former site of Former Site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium Practice Fields

One distinctive landmark that remains just northeast of the former site of West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium is the former West Palm Beach Auditorium, now the West Palm Beach Christian Convention Center.

West Palm Beach Christian Convention Center

Although both Connie Mack Field and West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium are now lost ballparks, The Remembering Connie Mack Field Committee has done a wonderful job of memorializing the history and former site of Connie Mack Field. Perhaps a similar group will take it upon itself to memorialize West Palm Beach Municipal Stadium as well. These ballparks are significant to the history of baseball in Florida, for both their Spring Training games and the minor league teams that played at those ballparks.

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Posted in Connie Mack Field and Municipal Stadium, Florida ballparks | Comments (0)

Buffalo Base Ball Park and Offermann Stadium

January 28th, 2015

Professional baseball was played at the corner of East Ferry and Michigan Avenue in Buffalo, New York, for 72 years beginning in 1889, through the end of the 1960 season.

Postcard, Buffalo Base Ball Park, Buffalo, New York (David Ellis Publisher)

Postcard, Buffalo Base Ball Park, Buffalo, New York (David Ellis Publisher)

Originally known as new Olympic Park (old Olympic Park housed Buffalo baseball teams from 1884 to 1888 at the intersection of Richmond Avenue and Summer Street), in 1907 the ballpark was renamed Buffalo Base Ball Park. The original wooden ballpark structure was raised in 1924 and replaced with a concrete and steel structure, and renamed Bison Stadium. In 1935 the ballpark was renamed Offermann Stadium, in honor of Frank J. Offermann, the recently-deceased former owner of the Buffalo Bison.

Entrance to Offerman Stadium (photo courtesy of the Buffalo Sports Museum)

Entrance to Offermann Stadium (photo courtesy of the Buffalo Sports Museum)

The site’s primary tenant was the International League Buffalo Bison, who played there from 1889 to 1960. According to Philip Lowry’s Green Cathedrals, Major league baseball also was played at this site for one year in 1890 when the Buffalo Bison of the Players League played their home games at new Olympic Park. The Negro National League New York Black Yankees played games at Offermann Park as a neutral site in the 1940s. The Negro American League Indianapolis Clowns played some games at Offermann (neutral site) from 1951 to 1955. Professional football also was played at the site, including National Football League Buffalo franchises (the All-Americans from 1920 to 1923, the Buffalo Bisons from 1924 to 1925, and 1927 to 1929, and the Buffalo Rangers in 1926).

Bethel AME Church, intersection of East Ferry Street and Michigan Avenue, Buffalo, New York

Bethel AME Church, intersection of East Ferry Street and Michigan Avenue, Buffalo, New York

The ballpark was located directly behind what is now the Bethel AME Church (formerly Covenant Presbyterian Church), with home plate near the back of the church at the intersection of East Ferry Street and Michigan Avenue.

Intersection of Masten Avenue and Woodlawn Avenue, Buffalo, New York

Intersection of Masten Avenue and Woodlawn Avenue, Buffalo, New York

The ballpark faced Southeast towards the intersection of Masten Avenue and Woodlawn Avenue. Center field was located on the northwest corner of that intersection. After the ballpark was demolished in 1962, Woodlawn Junior High School was constructed on the site. To see an aerial photograph of Offermann Stadium from 1956 click here (fixbuffalo.blogspot.com).

Corner Stone for Woodlawn Jr. High, Buffalo, New York

Corner Stone for Woodlawn Jr. High, Buffalo, New York

The Buffalo Academy for Visual and Performing Arts now occupies the site.

The Buffalo Academy for Visual and Performing Arts, Located on the Former Site of Offerman Stadium.

The Buffalo Academy for Visual and Performing Arts, Located on the Former Site of Offermann Stadium.

In 2012, John Boutet of the Buffalo Sports Museum spearheaded a drive to place a historical plaque at the site. The plaque notes that Babe Ruth, Jackie Robinson, and Hank Aaron all played baseball at Offermann Stadium. Babe Ruth played one of his first professional games at what was then Buffalo Base Ball Park, pitching in 1914 for the International League Baltimore Orioles.

Historical Plaque at the Former Site of Offerman Stadium

Historical Plaque at the Former Site of Offermann Stadium

The former site of right field was located at the northeast corner of Woodlawn Avenue and Michigan Avenue.

Intersection of Woodlawn Avenue and Michigan Avenue, Buffalo, New York

Intersection of Woodlawn Avenue and Michigan Avenue, Buffalo, New York, Former Site of Offermann Stadium’s Right Field

The former site of left field was located at the southwest corner of Masten Avenue and Ferry Street.

Intersection of Masten Avenue and Ferry Street, Buffalo, New York

Intersection of Masten Avenue and Ferry Street, Buffalo, New York, Former Site of Offermann Stadium’s Left Field

The area behind what was once the ballpark’s home plate is now a parking lot for the school.

Former Site of Offerman Stadium Infield

Former Site of Offermann Stadium Infield

In addition to Bethel AME Church, many other structures surrounding the ballpark date to the time of Buffalo Base Ball Park and Offermann Stadium. The houses in the photograph below sat just beyond the ballpark’s center field fence.

Houses at the Intersection of Woodlawn Avenue and Masten Avenue, Buffalo, New York

Houses at the Intersection of Woodlawn Avenue and Masten Avenue, Buffalo, New York

Houses at the intersection Masten Avenue and Ferry Street sat beyond the ballpark’s left field corner.

Houses at the Intersection of Masten Avenue and Ferry Street

Houses at the Intersection of Masten Avenue and Ferry Street

The Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Building at 78 East Ferry Street ran parallel to third base.

Brick Building Located on Ferry Street, Near Former Site of Third Base Line

NFTA Metro Building Located on Ferry Street, Sat Parallel to Former Site of Third Base Line

In 1961, the Buffalo Bison moved ten blocks south from Offermann Stadium to Buffalo’s War Memorial Stadium.

Aerial View, Buffalo War Memorial, Buffalo, New York

Aerial View, War Memorial Stadium, Buffalo, New York

In 1988, the Bison (American Association) moved two miles southwest to Pilot Stadium, later renamed Coca-Cola Field

Coca-Cola Field, Buffalo, New York, Home of the Buffalo Bison

Coca-Cola Field, Buffalo, New York, Home of the Buffalo Bison

Coca-Cola Field includes a wonderful museum – The Buffalo Sports Museum – featuring memorabilia from and information about Offermann Stadium, as well as Buffalo’s other ballparks. It certainly is worth a visit if you haven’t been there already.

Buffalo Sports Museum Display Featuring Offerman Stadium, as well as Former Buffalo Bison Luke Easter

Buffalo Sports Museum Display Featuring Offermann Stadium, as well as Former Buffalo Bison Luke Easter

The City of Buffalo boasts a rich baseball history, much of it taking place years ago at the intersection of  East Ferry and Michigan Avenue. Although the ballpark is long gone, enough of the neighborhood that existed at the time of Buffalo Base Ball Park and Offermann Stadium remains to give anyone with an interest in the National Pastime with a sense of where the ballpark once stood. The former ballpark site is located just three miles north of Coca-Cola Field and for fans of the game it certainly is worth the trip.

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Posted in New York ballparks, Offermann Stadium | Comments (0)

Milwaukee County Stadium – Home Field To Three Different MLB Franchises

November 12th, 2013

Milwaukee County Stadium was located at 201 South 46th Street, nine miles southwest of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Built entirely with public funds, County Stadium initially was conceived as a new ballpark for the American Association Milwaukee Brewers. However, that minor league team never had the chance to play at the new stadium because of the arrival in 1953 of the National League Milwaukee Braves.

County Stadium Panoramic

The Braves franchise had played the previous 82 seasons in Boston, most recently (1915-1952) at Braves Field, located less than two miles west of Fenway Park. Indeed, the Braves are the oldest continuously operating professional sports franchise in United States.

Milwaukee County Stadium (Postcard Genuine Curteich-Chicago, Dist. by L.L. Cook Co.)

The Braves never had a losing season while in Milwaukee. In 1957, they brought Milwaukee a World Series title as well as a second National League pennant the following year. However, by 1965 the team was on its way out of town – the team’s new owner having shopped the Braves in search of a larger market with a larger television audience. The team moved to Atlanta’s new Fulton County Stadium for the 1966 season.

Exterior of Milwaukee County Stadium

In 1968 and 1969, through the efforts of local business man Bud Selig, the Chicago White Sox played several home dates at County Stadium. Selig’s plan was to demonstrate to Major League Baseball through the attendance at those games that Milwaukee still deserved to be a major league city. Selig’s efforts paid off and, in 1970 the expansion Seattle Pilots, after only one season in Seattle, moved to Milwaukee.

Miller Park Under Construction with Milwaukee County Stadium Awaiting Its Fate

The Brewers played at County Stadium from 1970, through the 2000 season. In 2001, they moved to a new ballpark built in a parking lot just south of County Stadium.

Raising the Roof at Miller Park, Milwaukee County Stadium is to the Right

The difference between the two ballparks could not be more striking. County Stadium was one of the last old school, classic double deck ballparks, while Miller Park, with it’s arched glass and steel enclosed roof, rises some 30 stories tall.

County Stadium with Miller Park Under Construction Behind Center Field

In addition to being the home ballpark for three different major league franchises, County Stadium also hosted some Green Bay Packers home games from 1953 to 1994.

Cubs Right Fielder Sammy Sosa at Milwaukee County Stadium

Bernie Brewer, the team’s mascot since the early 1970’s, had two different versions of beer keg chalet while at County Stadium. Both chalets, including the one in use during the final years of County Stadium, were purchased by Lakefront Brewery and relocated to the brewery at 1872 N Commerce Street. They can be seen as part of the brewery tour.

Bernie Brewer's Chalet, Milwaukee County Stadium

The Brewer’s sixth inning sausage race – known formally as Klement’s Racing Sausages – began at County Stadium in the mid 1990s.

The Four Racing Sausages - With the Addition of Chorizo - at Milwaukee County Stadium Circa 2000

Support columns for County Stadium’s upper deck afforded fans sitting underneath it in the lower seating bowl penty of obstructed views. The upper deck  seating was accessed from the upper level concourse by a series of catwalks.

Lower Seating Bowl, Section 3, Milwaukee County Stadium, with View of the Upper Level Concourse

County Stadium’s narrow concourses were typical for ballparks of that era.

Souvenir Stand, Milwaukee County Stadium

With Miller Park looming in the background during County Stadium’s final season, Brewers fans had a constant reminder that the end was near for the old ballpark. Even County Stadium’s scoreboard added to the drumbeat, advertising the sale of stadium seats to be made available soon after the end of the 2000 season.

Milwaukee County Stadium Scoreboard Advertising The Sale of Seats from the Stadium

The Brewers and Milwaukee County have done a good job keeping the memory of County Stadium alive. Helfaer Field is a youth baseball field constructed on the former site of County Stadium. The field is named in honor of Evan Helfaer, a part owner of the Brewers at the time of their arrival in Milwaukee. A foundation in his name helped provide funds to build the field.

Helfaer Field Located on the Former Site of Milwaukee County Stadium

On the concourse behind Helfaer Field’s third base is a marker noting the spot of County Stadium’s home plate. The foul poles used at Helfaer Field are from County Stadium.

Milwaukee County Stadium Right Field Foul Pole Now Relocated To Helfaer Field

Much of County Stadium’s third base grandstand and left field is now a parking lot – “Brewers 1.” Behind Helfaer Field’s left field corner (on what was once County Stadium’s left field foul line) is a granite monument honoring the Milwaukee Braves.

Milwaukee County Stadium's Left Field Grandstand and Bleachers - Now "Brewers 1" Parking Lot

In the parking lot beyond Helfaer Field’s left field fence (Brewer 1) is an inground marker surrounded by red concrete bricks that honors Hank Aaron’s last home run. The plaque states: “This marks the landing location of the final home run of Hank Aaron’s career, #755, hit at County Stadium on July 20, 1976.” Aaron, who began his major league career with the Milwaukee Braves in 1954, returned to Milwaukee at the end of his career, playing for the Brewers in 1975 and 1976.

County Stadium’s first base grandstand, and portions of right field, are now a parking lot in front of Miller Park demarcated as “Cubs” lot.

Milwaukee County Stadium's Right Field Grandstand and Scoreboard - Now "Cubs" Parking Lot

In front of Miller Park are statues honoring Robin Yount , Hank Aaron, Bud Selig, and Bob Uecker. A sculpture entitled “Teamwork,” by artist Omri Amrany, honors Jerome Starr, Jeff Wischer, and William DeGrave, three construction workers killed during construction of Miller Park.

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J.P. Small Memorial Park – Jacksonville’s Oldest Ballfield

September 13th, 2013

Baseball has been played at 1701 Myrtle Avenue in Jacksonville, Florida, since 1912. Currently known as J.P. Small Memorial Park, the ball field has been the site of major league spring training, minor league games, Negro League games, and countless high school and college contests, as well as high school and college football.

J.P. Small Park, Jacksonville, Florida

From 1912 until 1926 it was known as Barrs Field, named in honor of local businessman Amander Barrs who spearheaded construction of the field. The first professional game played on that field was held on April 18, 1912, with the Jacksonville Tarpons defeating the Savannah Indians 4-1. To put that in perspective, the RMS Titanic sank just three days earlier on April 14-15 1912, and the Boston Redsox played their first professional game at Fenway Park just five days later, defeating the New York Highlanders 7-6 on April 20, 1912.

J.P. Small Park – Baseball Has Been Played On This Field Since 1911

In 1915 and 1916 it was the spring training home for Connie Mack’s Philadelphia Athletics. The Pittsburgh Pirates trained at Barrs Field in 1918 and the Brooklyn Dodgers trained there in 1919, 1920, and 1922.

Philadelphia Athletics Train at Barrs Field in 1916 (J.P. Smalls Park Negro League Museum)

In 1926 the field came under the ownership of the City of Jacksonville and the name of the ballpark was changed to Joseph H. Durkee Athletic Field.The original grandstand was constructed of wood, which was destroyed by a fire in 1934.

Grandstand at J.P. Smalls Parkk

The current grandstand was constructed in 1935. An exhibition celebrating the remodeled stadium was played in March 1935 between the Philadelphia Athletics and the New York Giants.

J.P. Small Park Grandstand Constructed in 1935

In 1937 the city added an additional section to the grandstand along the third base side.

1937 Addition to Grandstand at J.P. Small Park

The minor league Jacksonville Tarpons played at Barrs Field, from the ballpark’s inaugural game in April 1912, through the 1917 season. The Jacksonville Scouts (later called the Indians) of the Florida State League played at Barrs Field in the early 1920s. Football also was played at Barrs Field, which for a time hosted University of Florida football games, including the very first game ever between the University of Florida and the University of Georgia, on November 6, 1915.

Original 1935 Grandstand As Seen From 7th Street

In 1926 the Southern League Jacksonville Tars began play at newly renamed Durkee Field with future Hall of Famer Rube Marquard as their manager. The 1927 New York Yankees, featuring rs Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig also played at Durkee Field. On April 1st of that year the Yankees played a spring exhibition game against the St. Louis Cardinals, in which Ruth hit a ball into the overflow crowd in right field, for a ground rule double.

Field Entrance to 1937 Grandstand Addition

The Southern Negro League Jacksonville Red Caps (owned by the Jacksonville Terminal Station, hence the name) also played their home games at Barr Field, later Durkee Field. In 1938 the Red Caps attained major league status joining Negro American League and played at Durkee Field for one season before relocating to Cleveland. The Red Caps returned to Jacksonville for the 1941 and 1942 seasons.

Historic 1937 Dugout With Entrance to Clubhouse

In 1938 the Jacksonville Tars were a farm team for the New York Giants. In 1952 they became a farm team for the Milwaukee Braves, changing their name to the Jacksonville Braves.

Entrance to the Third Base Side Dugout (now boarded up)

In 1953 the Braves added Hank Aaron to their roster, becoming one of two teams to break the color line in the South Atlantic League.

Stairway From Third Base Dugout To Locker Room

The last year of professional play at Durkee Field was 1954. In 1955, the Jacksonville Braves moved to a newly constructed ballpark later renamed in honor of their owner Samuel Wolfson. Jacksonville’s minor league team played at Wolfson Park through the 2002 season. In 2003 they moved to the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville, constructed on the former site of Wolfson Park.

Bragan Field, the Baseball Grounds of Jacksonville

In 1980 the City of Jacksonville renovated the ballpark and renamed it in honor of James P. Small, a longtime baseball coach at Stanton High School in Jacksonville.

Ticket Booths With Plaque Commemorating J.P. Small Memorial Park

J.P. Small Park also includes a Negro League Museum with information about the ballpark and the teams that played there.

Negro League Museum Display, J.P. Small Park

The museum also honors J.P. Small and his many years working with the youth of Jacksonville.

Museum Display Honoring J.P. Small

Installed in 2006, outside the ballpark is a statue of Buck O’Neil, honoring the historical significance of J.P. Small Park to the history of Negro League baseball.

Buck O’Neil Statute Outside J.P. Small Park

J.P. Small Park is currently the home of the Stanton College Preparatory School baseball team. The caretaker of the park, a wonderful man named Russell, was kind enough to give us a tour of the entire ballpark on our visit.

Locker Room, J.P. Small Park, With Russell, the Caretaker Of The Ballpark

J.P. Small Park is a baseball time capsule. Its rich history and its beautiful preservation make it a must-see for anyone who appreciates old ballparks. For more information about the history of the park be sure to read the National Register of Historic Places Application issued by the National Park Service, placing J.P. Smalls Stadium on the Historic Register.

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Fulton County Stadium Makes A Great Parking Lot – For Now

April 23rd, 2010

Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium was the fourth home of the National League Braves and the first in Atlanta. The Braves two previous homes were Braves Field in Boston and County Stadium in Milwaukee.

Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium, Once Home of the Braves (Dexter Press, Inc.)

Once nestled at the confluence of Interstates 75, 85, and 20, Fulton County Stadium is now a parking lot.

The Friendly Confines of Atlanta/Fulton County Stadium and Interstate 75 (Scenic South Card Co.)

Unlike other lost ballparks, however, Fulton County Stadium is not quite gone or forgotten.  Portions of the old ballpark remain in the parking lot adjacent to the Braves’ current home, Turner Field.

Baseball Paradise Now A Parking Lot

The stadium’s outer retaining wall, now painted blue, marks the outline of Fulton County Stadium.

Fulton County Stadium Outer Wall

The blue outer wall marks the area from the right field corner around to the first base side of home plate.

The Right Field Corner

The infield, foul lines, and warning track are marked with brown pavers.

No Place Like Home

And if all that weren’t enough, the que de gras of the former Fulton County Stadium site is the portion of the metal, outfield fence marking where Hank Aaron’s record breaking home run number 715 cleared Dodger’s outfielder Bill Buckner and landed in the mit of Braves relief pitcher Tom House, who was standing in the Braves’ bullpen.

"There's new home run champion of all time and it's Henry Aaron" (Braves Announcer Milo Hamilton)

Hank Aaron at Fulton County Stadium (1972 Atlanta Braves Fan Photo)

In 1997, the Braves moved across Hank Aaron Street to Turner Field.

Turner Field, Home of the Atlanta Braves

The original plaque honoring Fulton County Stadium – Atlanta Stadium – is located in the plaza outside the main gate of Turner Field just south of Georgia Avenue.

Original "Atlanta Stadium" Plaque Now Located Outside Turner Field

Located on the northwest side of Turner Field at Aisle 134 is the Ivan Allen Jr. Braves Museum & Hall of Fame which includes over 600 Braves artifacts and photographs, including several items from Fulton County Stadium.

Turnstile from Fulton County Stadium

The Braves museums offers fans the chance to sit in Fulton County Stadium seats and relive Hank Aaron’s famous home run breaking Babe Ruth’s record of 714.

Stadium Seats from Fulton County Stadium

The Atlanta dugout is recreated as well, including the bat and helmet racks.

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Recreated Dugout of Fulton County Stadium

Fans are free to have a seat on the dugout bench or lean on the railing.

Dugout from Fulton County Stadium

Former player lockers from Fulton County Stadium are used throughout the museum to display Atlanta Braves memorabilia.

Fulton County Stadium Player Lockers

The piece de resistance of the Braves museum is the actual ball that Hank Aaron hit over Fulton County Stadium’s left field wall to break Babe Ruth’s home run record of 714. Also on display is the bat Hammerin Hank used that day.

One of the Greatest Baseball Artifacts Ever - Hank Aaron's Home Run Ball No. 715

Any fan of the game visiting Atlanta or Turner Field should make a stop at the parking lot across the street.  Thanks to the forward thinking of Atlanta officials, it is still possible visit Fulton County Stadium and experience its most famous moment. Once inside Turner Field, the Braves Museum and Hall of Fame is definitely worth the one token it costs to enter (approximately $2).

With the Braves announcement in November 2013 that the team will be leaving Turner Field at the end of the 2016 season for a new ballpark to be built in Cobb, a suburb ten miles north of Atlanta, the future of the Fulton County Stadium parking lot and stadium markers is now in doubt. Demolition of Turner Field is scheduled for 2017. Only time will tell what, if anything, will remain of Fulton County Stadium or Turner Field.

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